Zearalenone

Zearalenone, an anabolic and uterotrophic metabolite, is frequently

found in commercial cereal grains and in processed

foods and feeds, and is often reported as causative agent of

naturally occurring hyperestrogenism and infertility in swine,

poultry and cattle.18

What this means is, in animals, “zear” looks likes extra estrogen

to the body. Does it affect humans the same way? Are high

estrogen levels a problem for us? I find nearly every breast

cancer case shows a too-high estrogen level for years before the

cancer is found! It starts females maturing too early, too. It could

cause PMS, ovarian cysts and infertility. Not everybody gets all

of these effects. And what is the effect on men and boys of eating

an estrogen-like mycotoxin in their daily diet? This female

hormone could have a drastic effect on the maturing process even

in small amounts.

Zearalenone ("zear") and aflatoxin both have immune lowering

effects. Zearalenone can induce thymic atrophy and

macrophage activation.19 If you have low immunity (low T

18 Bottalico, A., Lerario, P., and Visconti, A., Production of

Zearalenone, Trichothecenes and Moniliformin By Fusarium Species

From Cereals, In Italy. From Toxigenic Fungi, Vol 7, edited by H.

Kurata and Y. Ueno, copublished by Kodansha Ltd, Tokyo and Elsevier

Science Publishers B.V., Amsterdam, 1984, page 199.

19 Luster, M.I., Boorman, GA., Korach, K.S., Dieter, M.P., and

Hong, L. 1984. Myelotoxicity toxicity resulting from exogenous estrogens

evidence for bimodal mechanism of action. Int. J. Immunopharmacol.

6:287-297. cells, low white blood cell count, and so forth), immediately go

off moldy food suspects.

“Zear” is the mycotoxin that prevents you from detoxifying

benzene. Every AIDS sufferer I see has a crippled ability to detoxify

benzene; they also have zear!

The main zear sources I have found so far are popcorn, corn

chips, and brown rice. But it was absent in fresh corn, canned

corn, corn tortillas, and white rice, making me wonder how it

gets in our processed corn products.



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